ASN RSS https://amnat.org/ Latest press releases and announcements from the ASN en-us Wed, 18 May 2022 05:00:00 GMT 60 ASN Awards for Support of Regional Meetings in Ecology, Evolution, and Behavior https://amnat.org/announcements/CallRegionalWkshp.html The American Society of Naturalists calls for proposals for grants in support of regional conferences and workshops. ASN offers grants, typically under $2500, to support undergraduate and/or graduate student involvement in (1) topically-broad but regionally-focussed small meetings on ecology and/or evolution and (2) training workshops on more specialized topics within the scope of ASN’s goals to advance the conceptual unification of biology. These grants are intended to strengthen the valuable role that such regional meetings and workshops can play in the development of younger members of our field. We particularly seek proposals that benefit ASN student members from the grants. Proposals can be brief, even less than a page. The proposal should indicate the name and intended dates of the meeting or workshop and describe the topical scope of the event. The proposal should indicate how the funds will be used, including a description of how they directly benefit ASN student members. After the event, we request a brief report indicating how funds were used and how students were benefited. Previous proposals, for example, have paid for reduced registration costs for ASN student members or paid for plenary speakers, for example. For this year in particular, we will also entertain proposals for grants that would enable re-starting meetings delayed by the response to COVID. The event in question should be open to participants from more than a single institution. Proposals are invited at any time without a fixed deadline. They may be sent to Mike Whitlock (whitlock@zoology.ubc.ca), 2022 chair of the ASN committee for these grants. Please feel free to contact us for informal inquiries or more information. <p>The American Society of Naturalists calls for proposals for grants in support of regional conferences and workshops. </p><p>ASN offers grants, typically under $2500, to support undergraduate and/or graduate student involvement in (1) topically-broad but regionally-focussed small meetings on ecology and/or evolution and (2) training workshops on more specialized topics within the scope of ASN’s goals to advance the conceptual unification of biology. </p><p>These grants are intended to strengthen the valuable role that such regional meetings and workshops can play in the development of younger members of our field. We particularly seek proposals that benefit ASN student members from the grants. </p><p>Proposals can be brief, even less than a page. The proposal should indicate the name and intended dates of the meeting or workshop and describe the topical scope of the event. The proposal should indicate how the funds will be used, including a description of how they directly benefit ASN student members. After the event, we request a brief report indicating how funds were used and how students were benefited. </p><p>Previous proposals, for example, have paid for reduced registration costs for ASN student members or paid for plenary speakers, for example. For this year in particular, we will also entertain proposals for grants that would enable re-starting meetings delayed by the response to COVID. The event in question should be open to participants from more than a single institution. </p><p>Proposals are invited at any time without a fixed deadline. They may be sent to Mike Whitlock (<a href="mailto:whitlock@zoology.ubc.ca?subject= Regional conference/workshop ASN grant proposal">whitlock@zoology.ubc.ca</a>), 2022 chair of the ASN committee for these grants. Please feel free to contact us for informal inquiries or more information.</p> Tue, 17 May 2022 05:00:00 GMT 2022 ASN Presidential Award https://amnat.org/announcements/Presidential-Award-2022.html The Presidential Award is chosen by the President of the American Society of Naturalists from all of the papers published in The American Naturalist during the preceding calendar year. The 2022 ASN Presidential Award goes to Jessica Clark, Luke McNally, and Tom Little, for their 2021 article “Pathogen Dynamics Across the Diversity of Aging.” Integrating organismal biology, life history theory, demography, and epidemiology via theoretical and experimental studies of a classic model system, this paper provides unique and timely insights into disease spread and containment. <p>The Presidential Award is chosen by the President of the American Society of Naturalists from all of the papers published in <i>The American Naturalist</i> during the preceding calendar year. The 2022 ASN Presidential Award goes to Jessica Clark, Luke McNally, and Tom Little, for their 2021 article &ldquo;<a href="https://www.journals.uchicago.edu/doi/10.1086/712380">Pathogen Dynamics Across the Diversity of Aging</a>.&rdquo; Integrating organismal biology, life history theory, demography, and epidemiology via theoretical and experimental studies of a classic model system, this paper provides unique and timely insights into disease spread and containment.</p> Mon, 16 May 2022 05:00:00 GMT 2022 American Naturalist Student Paper Award https://amnat.org/announcements/Student-Paper-Award-2022.html The American Naturalist 2022 Student Paper Award is for work that was published in 2021 and that was performed primarily by the first author and primarily while she or he was an undergraduate or graduate student. The Editors of the journal, in consultation with Associate Editors, examine all student-authored papers in the journal to select an outstanding contribution that advances the journal’s goals of changing the way people think about organismal biology (including but not limited to ecology, evolution, and behavior) by providing new conceptual insights. The recipient of the 2022 Student Paper Award is Paul Walberg of Rutgers University for his paper “Warming Rates Alter Sequence of Disassembly in Experimental Communities” (with Edwin Green). This paper presents an experimental test of a fascinating and novel question: does the rate of warming change the order in which species are lost from communities? Honorable mentions: Ken Thompson (Stanford University) for “Patterns, Predictors, and Consequences of Dominance in Hybrids” (with Mackenzie Urquhart-Cronish, Kenneth Whitney, Loren Riesberg, and Dolph Schluter) Kora Klein (University of Zurich) for “Disentangling Verbal Arguments: Intralocus Sexual Conflict in Haplodiploids” (with Hanna Kokko and Hanna ten Brink) Veronica Zepeda (UNAM, Mexico) for “Effects of Phylogenetic Relatedness on Fluctuation-Dependent and Fluctuation-Independent Coexistence Mechanisms in Multispecies Communities” (with Carlos Martorell) <p><em>The American Naturalist</em> 2022 Student Paper Award is for work that was published in 2021 and that was performed primarily by the first author and primarily while she or he was an undergraduate or graduate student. <!-- There were 45 eligible papers. --> The Editors of the journal, in consultation with Associate Editors, examine all student-authored papers in the journal to select an outstanding contribution that advances the journal&rsquo;s goals of changing the way people think about organismal biology (including but not limited to ecology, evolution, and behavior) by providing new conceptual insights.</p> <p>The recipient of the 2022 Student Paper Award is <b>Paul Walberg</b> of Rutgers University for his paper &ldquo;<a href="https://www.journals.uchicago.edu/doi/10.1086/716577">Warming Rates Alter Sequence of Disassembly in Experimental Communities</a>&rdquo; (with Edwin Green). This paper presents an experimental test of a fascinating and novel question: does the rate of warming change the order in which species are lost from communities?</p> <p>Honorable mentions:</p> <ul> <li>Ken Thompson (Stanford University) for &ldquo;<a href="https://www.journals.uchicago.edu/doi/10.1086/712603">Patterns, Predictors, and Consequences of Dominance in Hybrids</a>&rdquo; (with Mackenzie Urquhart-Cronish, Kenneth Whitney, Loren Riesberg, and Dolph Schluter)</li> <li>Kora Klein (University of Zurich) for &ldquo;<a href="https://www.journals.uchicago.edu/doi/10.1086/716908">Disentangling Verbal Arguments: Intralocus Sexual Conflict in Haplodiploids</a>&rdquo; (with Hanna Kokko and Hanna ten Brink)</li> <li>Veronica Zepeda (UNAM, Mexico) for &ldquo;<a href="https://www.journals.uchicago.edu/doi/10.1086/714161">Effects of Phylogenetic Relatedness on Fluctuation-Dependent and Fluctuation-Independent Coexistence Mechanisms in Multispecies Communities</a>&rdquo; (with Carlos Martorell)</li> </ul> Mon, 16 May 2022 05:00:00 GMT 2022 ASN Student Research Award https://amnat.org/announcements/Student-Research-Award-2022.html Nick Dorian, Tufts University Julia Harenc&aacute;r, UC Santa Cruz Anastasia Madsen, University of Nebraska Lincoln Cheyenne Payne, Stanford University Nitin Ravikanthachari, University of South Carolina Courtney Reed, Brown University Kelly Robinson, University of Nevada Reno Matthew Kustra, UC Santa Cruz Matthew Schumm, Florida State University Mackenzie Urquhart-Cronish, University of British Columbia Taylor Zallek, University of Pittsburgh The ASN Student Research Awards support research by student members that advances the goals of the society: the conceptual unification of ecology, evolution, or behavior. Each award consists of a $2,000 check to the candidate. An applicant must be a member of the ASN (membership is international), must hold a bachelor’s degree or equivalent, must have passed to candidacy in a PhD program or equivalent, and must be at least one year from completing the PhD. Projects in all types of research (i.e., laboratory, field, theory) are encouraged. Proposals are judged on originality, strength, and significance of the questions being addressed, prospects for significant results, and the match between the proposed research and the ASN mission. <ul> <li>Nick Dorian, Tufts University</li> <li>Julia Harenc&aacute;r, UC Santa Cruz</li> <li>Anastasia Madsen, University of Nebraska Lincoln</li> <li>Cheyenne Payne, Stanford University</li> <li>Nitin Ravikanthachari, University of South Carolina</li> <li>Courtney Reed, Brown University</li> <li>Kelly Robinson, University of Nevada Reno</li> <li>Matthew Kustra, UC Santa Cruz</li> <li>Matthew Schumm, Florida State University</li> <li>Mackenzie Urquhart-Cronish, University of British Columbia</li> <li>Taylor Zallek, University of Pittsburgh</li> </ul> <p>The ASN Student Research Awards support research by student members that advances the goals of the society: the conceptual unification of ecology, evolution, or behavior. Each award consists of a $2,000 check to the candidate. An applicant must be a member of the ASN (membership is international), must hold a bachelor&rsquo;s degree or equivalent, must have passed to candidacy in a PhD program or equivalent, and must be at least one year from completing the PhD.</p> <p>Projects in all types of research (i.e., laboratory, field, theory) are encouraged. Proposals are judged on originality, strength, and significance of the questions being addressed, prospects for significant results, and the match between the proposed research and the ASN mission.</p> Mon, 16 May 2022 05:00:00 GMT 2022 ASN Award for Distinguished Achievement in the Conceptual Unification of the Biological Sciences https://amnat.org/announcements/conceptual-unification-award-2022.html The ASN Award for Distinguished Achievement in the Conceptual Unification of the Biological Sciences is given annually to honor relatively senior but still active investigators who are making fundamental contributions to the Society&#39;s goals in promoting the conceptual unification of the biological sciences. The 2022 Conceptual Unification award goes to Laurent Keller of the University of Lausanne in recognition of his distinguished record of integrating ecology, evolution, genetics, and behavior to address fundamental questions about sociality, including the nature of within-colony conflict, genetic components of social insect differentiation, mechanisms of aging, and the genetic basis for social organization. <p>The ASN Award for Distinguished Achievement in the Conceptual Unification of the Biological Sciences is given annually to honor relatively senior but still active investigators who are making fundamental contributions to the Society&#39;s goals in promoting the conceptual unification of the biological sciences.</p> <p>The 2022 Conceptual Unification award goes to <strong>Laurent Keller</strong> of the University of Lausanne in recognition of his distinguished record of integrating ecology, evolution, genetics, and behavior to address fundamental questions about sociality, including the nature of within-colony conflict, genetic components of social insect differentiation, mechanisms of aging, and the genetic basis for social organization.</p> Mon, 16 May 2022 05:00:00 GMT 2022 IDEA Award Winner https://amnat.org/announcements/Idea-Award-2022.html The American Society of Naturalists, the Society for the Study of Evolution, and the Society of Systematic Biologists are pleased to announce the recipients of the 2022 Inclusiveness, Diversity, Equity, and Access (IDEA) Award, Diversity of Nature and its co-founders Melanie Massey and Suchinta Arif, in recognition of their successful efforts to develop national and local discovery-based programming to engage BIPOC students at multiple educational stages in evolution and ecology, as well as to provide scholarships to BIPOC youth pursuing post-secondary education in STEM. Thank you to DoN, Melanie Massey, and Suchinta Arif for your commitment and contributions to the community! The ASN/SSE/SSB Inclusiveness, Diversity, Equity, and Access (IDEA) Award was created in 2019 by the American Society of Naturalists (ASN), the Society for the Study of Evolution (SSE), and the Society of Systematic Biologists (SSB). The IDEA Award is given to a person at any career stage who has strengthened the ecology and evolutionary biology community by promoting inclusiveness and diversity in our fields. The award can also be presented to a group. The recipient receives a plaque at the annual meeting of ASN/SSB/SSE and a $1000 honorarium. <p>The American Society of Naturalists, the Society for the Study of Evolution, and the Society of Systematic Biologists are pleased to announce the recipients of the 2022 Inclusiveness, Diversity, Equity, and Access (IDEA) Award, <strong>Diversity of Nature</strong> and its co-founders <strong>Melanie Massey and Suchinta Arif</strong>, in recognition of their successful efforts to develop national and local discovery-based programming to engage BIPOC students at multiple educational stages in evolution and ecology, as well as to provide scholarships to BIPOC youth pursuing post-secondary education in STEM. Thank you to DoN, Melanie Massey, and Suchinta Arif for your commitment and contributions to the community!</p> <p>The ASN/SSE/SSB Inclusiveness, Diversity, Equity, and Access (IDEA) Award was created in 2019 by the American Society of Naturalists (ASN), the Society for the Study of Evolution (SSE), and the Society of Systematic Biologists (SSB). The IDEA Award is given to a person at any career stage who has strengthened the ecology and evolutionary biology community by promoting inclusiveness and diversity in our fields. The award can also be presented to a group. The recipient receives a plaque at the annual meeting of ASN/SSB/SSE and a $1000 honorarium.</p> Mon, 16 May 2022 05:00:00 GMT 2022 ASN Early Career Investigator Awards https://amnat.org/announcements/early-career-investigator-award-2022.html The American Society of Naturalist’s Early Career Investigator Award was first established in honor of Jasper Loftus-Hills, a young scientist who died tragically 3 years after receiving his PhD. This award goes to applicants who completed their PhD three years preceding the application deadline or are in their last year of a PhD program. We are pleased to announce that this year’s recipients of the ASN Early Career Investigator Awards are: Pavitra Muralidhar, University of California at Davis Kim Hoang, University of Oxford Chuliang Song, McGill University Rachel Moran, University of Chicago Laura Melissa Guzman, University of Southern California We are very much looking forward to their participation in the ASN Early Career Investigator symposium at the annual meeting in Cleveland, Ohio, this June. <p>The American Society of Naturalist&rsquo;s Early Career Investigator Award was first established in honor of Jasper Loftus-Hills, a young scientist who died tragically 3 years after receiving his PhD. This award goes to applicants who completed their PhD three years preceding the application deadline or are in their last year of a PhD program.</p> <p>We are pleased to announce that this year&rsquo;s recipients of the ASN Early Career Investigator Awards are:</p> <ul> <li>Pavitra Muralidhar, University of California at Davis</li> <li>Kim Hoang, University of Oxford</li> <li>Chuliang Song, McGill University</li> <li>Rachel Moran, University of Chicago</li> <li>Laura Melissa Guzman, University of Southern California</li> </ul> <p>We are very much looking forward to their participation in the ASN Early Career Investigator symposium at the annual meeting in Cleveland, Ohio, this June.</p> Mon, 16 May 2022 05:00:00 GMT 2022 ASN Distinguished Naturalist Award https://amnat.org/announcements/distinguished-naturalist-award-2022.html The ASN Distinguished Naturalist Award is given annually to an active midcareer scientist who has made significant contributions to the knowledge of a particular ecosystem or group of organisms and who, through this work, has illuminated key principles of evolutionary biology and an enhanced appreciation of natural history. The winner of the Distinguished Naturalist Award in 2022 is Tadashi Fukami of Stanford University, in recognition of ground-breaking research, richly infused with natural history, focusing on the ecological and evolutionary dynamics of community assembly, particularly the role of historical contingency. <p>The ASN Distinguished Naturalist Award is given annually to an active midcareer scientist who has made significant contributions to the knowledge of a particular ecosystem or group of organisms and who, through this work, has illuminated key principles of evolutionary biology and an enhanced appreciation of natural history. The winner of the Distinguished Naturalist Award in 2022 is Tadashi Fukami of Stanford University, in recognition of ground-breaking research, richly infused with natural history, focusing on the ecological and evolutionary dynamics of community assembly, particularly the role of historical contingency. </p> Mon, 16 May 2022 05:00:00 GMT Results of the 2022 Election https://amnat.org/announcements/ASN-election-results-2022.html The ASN has chosen three new officers. We congratulate the winners, whose election statements are presented below, as well as the distinguished runners-up, Greg Grether, Gil Rosenthal, and Martha Burford Reiskind.Election Statement: I am honored to be nominated to be President of ASN because I think my career has exemplified the ASN goal of conceptual unification of the biological sciences. My lab integrates evolution, genetics, genomics, and ecology in the laboratory, greenhouse, and field to understand how natural selection on weeds and native plants produces (sometimes very rapid) adaptation to a variable environment. I started out as a behavioral ecologist, with my first papers on lizards and beetles, and then switched to studying pollinator-mediated floral evolution during my postdoc. Current work also includes stamen loss after the transition to selfing, adaptation of a weed to agricultural habitats, and field estimates of fitness effects of duplicate gene knockouts. I received my Ph.D. in the Section of Neurobiology and Behavior at Cornell, then moved one building over to do an NIH individual NRSA postdoctoral fellow in evolutionary genetics. I was an Assistant Professor at University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign before moving to KBS where I am now Professor; I was also a Distinguished Sabbatical Scholar at the National Evolutionary Synthesis Center. I was elected as a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) in 2011 and won Outstanding Faculty awards at the college and university level, but my favorite awards are my college graduate and junior faculty mentoring awards, as I was nominated by my mentees for both and I see mentoring as the most important part of my job. I still often hear that my Primer of Ecological Genetics (with Dan Hartl) has been useful for graduate students. I was Handling Editor (now just called Editor) at Evolution, edited or co-edited special issues of the Methods in Ecology and Evolution and International Journal of Plant Sciences, and have served on the editorial boards of Evolution, Journal of Evolutionary Biology, Oecologia, and IJPS. I have served on several NSF and one USDA panels and was chair of the Plant Population Ecology Section of the Ecological Society of America. I honed leadership skills that I genuinely didn’t realize I had during almost two years as Interim Director of KBS. I am afraid that beyond being a member for decades, attending the joint meetings many times and publishing papers in The&nbsp;American Naturalist, I have not been as involved in ASN as I should have been! However, I am committed to doing a great job leading ASN if elected. I think the highest priority for ASN must be redoubling the great efforts underway to increase DEI in the Society and in our field; we have made progress on this in my lab and at KBS. I would advocate strongly for more support and mentoring for undergraduates and graduate students from underrepresented groups, including at our meetings, for including DEI efforts as an explicit criterion for ASN awards, and for a continued emphasis on safety and respectful behavior at our meetings.Election Statement: Reading The&nbsp;American Naturalist inspired me to shift my undergraduate aspirations from engineering to biology. I may have been misled by the journal title when looking for examples of ‘muddy boots’ biology, but it turns out the articles, with their integration of data and modeling in pursuit of conceptual advances, provided optimal inspiration for my biological career. I am thus honored to be nominated to serve as VP of the ASN. My research integrates modeling, field and lab collection of ecological and physiological data, and informatics to identify the organismal mechanisms underlying responses to climate change. I use the mechanisms to develop ecological and evolutionary forecasting approaches. I am a Professor of Biology at the University of Washington, where I am an affiliate of the Center for Quantitative Science and the eScience Data Science Institute and a board member of the Program in Climate Change. I studied biology and math at Williams College, conducted graduate research at Stanford University, and held postdoctoral fellowships at the National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis (NCEAS) and the Santa Fe Institute. I have been recognized as a Kavli Frontiers of Science Fellow and a Future Leader of the Science and Technology in Society Forum. I strive to build capacity for integrative, quantitative, collaborative, and open science to accelerate biology and its applications to environmental challenges in a manner that promotes equity and inclusion. I lead the TrEnCh project focused on developing computational and visualization tools to Translate Environmental Change into biological responses for research, education, and outreach (trenchproject.com). I have organized several symposia and workshops as well as NCEAS and National Evolutionary Synthesis Center working groups. I have served on the American Naturalist editorial board since 2018. I am grateful for The&nbsp;American Naturalist publishing one of my initial papers and hope to work with the ASN to facilitate other early career researchers adopting integrative approaches. I propose to organize a VP symposium highlighting integrative work by diverse scientists repeating historical experiments to understand mechanisms underlying responses to environmental change. I look forward to assisting the ASN in advancing conceptual unification of the biological sciences by capacity building, promoting a diverse and inclusive society, and inspiring integrative biological approaches if elected.Election Statement: I am thrilled to be nominated as a candidate for Treasurer for the American Society of Naturalists. As a supporter and member of ASN, and I would be honored to serve in this capacity. I am an evolutionary biologist, and my research focuses on the evolution of chemical signals in bees and the role that these signals play in a variety of biological contexts, including mate recognition, sexual selection, speciation, social interactions (e.g. eusociality), and species interactions (e.g. mutualism between plants and pollinators). To address these broad questions, my research combines chemical ecology, functional genomics, populations genetics and natural history. I received my B.Sc. from Universidad de los Andes (Bogot&aacute;, Colombia) in 2001. I completed my Ph.D. in the Department of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology at Harvard University in 2008. Subsequently, I worked as a postdoctoral fellow at the University of California Berkeley between 2008 and 2013. I am now an Associate Professor in the Department of Evolution and Ecology at the University of California Davis, where I have been since 2013. I was awarded a Packard Fellowship in 2014, and recently I was elected Chancellor Fellow at UC Davis. Currently, I am an Associate Editor for the journal Evolution, and I have served as a reviewer for multiple journals in the areas of evolution and ecology. I have participated in diverse departmental and university-wide committees. My extensive experience, knowledge and organizational skills would allow me to assume the important role of Treasurer for the American Society of Naturalists. I have been a member of the ASN for several years, and I have been an avid reader of The&nbsp;American Naturalist since I was a graduate student. Becoming the Treasurer for ASN is an ideal opportunity for me to contribute in meaningful ways to the growth and stability of our society. The Treasurer fulfills an important role in the American Society of Naturalists. This officer position oversees many of the day-to-day activities of the society, including making payments to publishers, issuing grants and awards in a timely manner, and making sure that all the financial information is organized and updated in a regular basis. I would ensure open and fluid communication with other officers and accountants. In addition, as a member of the executive committee I would ensure that our society continues its mission of excellence in the fields of evolution and ecology, and also continue with its mission to increase diversity and representation of scientists around the world. <p>The ASN <a href="https://www.amnat.org/announcements/ASN-election-2022.html">has chosen</a> three new officers. We congratulate the winners, whose election statements are presented below, as well as the distinguished runners-up, Greg Grether, Gil Rosenthal, and Martha Burford Reiskind.</p><p><strong>Election Statement:</strong><br/> I am honored to be nominated to be President of ASN because I think my career has exemplified the ASN goal of conceptual unification of the biological sciences. My lab integrates evolution, genetics, genomics, and ecology in the laboratory, greenhouse, and field to understand how natural selection on weeds and native plants produces (sometimes very rapid) adaptation to a variable environment. I started out as a behavioral ecologist, with my first papers on lizards and beetles, and then switched to studying pollinator-mediated floral evolution during my postdoc. Current work also includes stamen loss after the transition to selfing, adaptation of a weed to agricultural habitats, and field estimates of fitness effects of duplicate gene knockouts.</p> <p>I received my Ph.D. in the Section of Neurobiology and Behavior at Cornell, then moved one building over to do an NIH individual NRSA postdoctoral fellow in evolutionary genetics. I was an Assistant Professor at University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign before moving to KBS where I am now Professor; I was also a Distinguished Sabbatical Scholar at the National Evolutionary Synthesis Center. I was elected as a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) in 2011 and won Outstanding Faculty awards at the college and university level, but my favorite awards are my college graduate and junior faculty mentoring awards, as I was nominated by my mentees for both and I see mentoring as the most important part of my job. I still often hear that my <i>Primer of Ecological Genetics</i> (with Dan Hartl) has been useful for graduate students. I was Handling Editor (now just called Editor) at <i>Evolution</i>, edited or co-edited special issues of the <i>Methods in Ecology and Evolution</i> and <i>International Journal of Plant Sciences</i>, and have served on the editorial boards of <i>Evolution, Journal of Evolutionary Biology, Oecologia,</i> and <i>IJPS</i>. I have served on several NSF and one USDA panels and was chair of the Plant Population Ecology Section of the Ecological Society of America. I honed leadership skills that I genuinely didn&rsquo;t realize I had during almost two years as Interim Director of KBS.</p> <p>I am afraid that beyond being a member for decades, attending the joint meetings many times and publishing papers in <i>The&nbsp;American Naturalist</i>, I have not been as involved in ASN as I should have been! However, I am committed to doing a great job leading ASN if elected. I think the highest priority for ASN must be redoubling the great efforts underway to increase DEI in the Society and in our field; we have made progress on this in my lab and at KBS. I would advocate strongly for more support and mentoring for undergraduates and graduate students from underrepresented groups, including at our meetings, for including DEI efforts as an explicit criterion for ASN awards, and for a continued emphasis on safety and respectful behavior at our meetings.</p><p><strong>Election Statement:</strong><br/> Reading <i>The&nbsp;American Naturalist</i> inspired me to shift my undergraduate aspirations from engineering to biology. I may have been misled by the journal title when looking for examples of &lsquo;muddy boots&rsquo; biology, but it turns out the articles, with their integration of data and modeling in pursuit of conceptual advances, provided optimal inspiration for my biological career. I am thus honored to be nominated to serve as VP of the ASN. My research integrates modeling, field and lab collection of ecological and physiological data, and informatics to identify the organismal mechanisms underlying responses to climate change. I use the mechanisms to develop ecological and evolutionary forecasting approaches.</p> <p>I am a Professor of Biology at the University of Washington, where I am an affiliate of the Center for Quantitative Science and the eScience Data Science Institute and a board member of the Program in Climate Change. I studied biology and math at Williams College, conducted graduate research at Stanford University, and held postdoctoral fellowships at the National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis (NCEAS) and the Santa Fe Institute. I have been recognized as a Kavli Frontiers of Science Fellow and a Future Leader of the Science and Technology in Society Forum.</p> <p>I strive to build capacity for integrative, quantitative, collaborative, and open science to accelerate biology and its applications to environmental challenges in a manner that promotes equity and inclusion. I lead the TrEnCh project focused on developing computational and visualization tools to Translate Environmental Change into biological responses for research, education, and outreach (<a href="trenchproject.com">trenchproject.com</a>). I have organized several symposia and workshops as well as NCEAS and National Evolutionary Synthesis Center working groups.</p> <p>I have served on the <i>American Naturalist</i> editorial board since 2018. I am grateful for <i>The&nbsp;American Naturalist</i> publishing one of my initial papers and hope to work with the ASN to facilitate other early career researchers adopting integrative approaches.</p> <p>I propose to organize a VP symposium highlighting integrative work by diverse scientists repeating historical experiments to understand mechanisms underlying responses to environmental change. I look forward to assisting the ASN in advancing conceptual unification of the biological sciences by capacity building, promoting a diverse and inclusive society, and inspiring integrative biological approaches if elected.</p><p><strong>Election Statement:</strong><br/> I am thrilled to be nominated as a candidate for Treasurer for the American Society of Naturalists. As a supporter and member of ASN, and I would be honored to serve in this capacity. I am an evolutionary biologist, and my research focuses on the evolution of chemical signals in bees and the role that these signals play in a variety of biological contexts, including mate recognition, sexual selection, speciation, social interactions (e.g. eusociality), and species interactions (e.g. mutualism between plants and pollinators). To address these broad questions, my research combines chemical ecology, functional genomics, populations genetics and natural history.</p> <p>I received my B.Sc. from Universidad de los Andes (Bogot&aacute;, Colombia) in 2001. I completed my Ph.D. in the Department of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology at Harvard University in 2008. Subsequently, I worked as a postdoctoral fellow at the University of California Berkeley between 2008 and 2013. I am now an Associate Professor in the Department of Evolution and Ecology at the University of California Davis, where I have been since 2013. I was awarded a Packard Fellowship in 2014, and recently I was elected Chancellor Fellow at UC Davis.</p> <p>Currently, I am an Associate Editor for the journal <i>Evolution</i>, and I have served as a reviewer for multiple journals in the areas of evolution and ecology. I have participated in diverse departmental and university-wide committees. My extensive experience, knowledge and organizational skills would allow me to assume the important role of Treasurer for the American Society of Naturalists. I have been a member of the ASN for several years, and I have been an avid reader of <i>The&nbsp;American Naturalist</i> since I was a graduate student. Becoming the Treasurer for ASN is an ideal opportunity for me to contribute in meaningful ways to the growth and stability of our society.</p> <p>The Treasurer fulfills an important role in the American Society of Naturalists. This officer position oversees many of the day-to-day activities of the society, including making payments to publishers, issuing grants and awards in a timely manner, and making sure that all the financial information is organized and updated in a regular basis. I would ensure open and fluid communication with other officers and accountants. In addition, as a member of the executive committee I would ensure that our society continues its mission of excellence in the fields of evolution and ecology, and also continue with its mission to increase diversity and representation of scientists around the world.</p> Mon, 04 Apr 2022 05:00:00 GMT New special section! Nature, Data, and Power: How hegemonies shape biological knowledge https://amnat.org/announcements/nature-data-power.html Early in 2021, The American Naturalist announced a call for papers for a new special section addressing how systems of power and oppression have shaped theory and practice in organismal biology. “Nature, Data, and Power: How hegemonies shape biological knowledge” is an interdisciplinary section, written for an audience of biology researchers, aiming to identify problems within current theories and practices and also make suggestions on how we can transform our thinking and produce more just science. We are proud to announce that these papers are now available (in early, non-typeset versions) from the journal’s Just Accepted page. The special section is as follows: “Nature, Data, and Power: How Hegemonies Shaped this Special Section” by Kamath et&nbsp;al. “Moving beyond the ‘diversity paradox’: the limitations of competition-based frameworks in understanding species diversity” by Simha et&nbsp;al. “Discussions of the ‘not-so-fit’: how ableism limits diverse thought and investigative potential in evolutionary biology” by Branch et&nbsp;al. “What’s Gender Got to Do With It? Dismantling the Human Hierarchies in Evolutionary Biology and Environmental Toxicology for Scientific and Social Progress” by Packer & Lambert “How Neanderthals became White: The introgression of race into contemporary human evolutionary genomics” by Weasel “Colonial legacies influence biodiversity lessons: how past trade routes and power dynamics shape present-day scientific research and professional opportunities for Caribbean scientists” by Mohammed et&nbsp;al. “Transforming Restoration Science: Multiple Knowledges and Community Research Cogeneration in the Klamath and Duwamish Rivers” by Klein et&nbsp;al. “Fish, people, and systems of power: understanding and disrupting feedback between colonialism and fisheries science” by Silver et&nbsp;al. An earlier version of this announcement was posted on February 11, 2021, announcing the call for papers. <p>Early in 2021, <i>The American Naturalist</i> announced a <a href="https://comments.amnat.org/2021/01/call-for-special-topics-paper.html">call for papers</a> for a new special section addressing how systems of power and oppression have shaped theory and practice in organismal biology. <strong> &ldquo;Nature, Data, and Power: How hegemonies shape biological knowledge&rdquo;</strong> is an interdisciplinary section, written for an audience of biology researchers, aiming to identify problems within current theories and practices and also make suggestions on how we can transform our thinking and produce more just science.</p> <p>We are proud to announce that these papers are now available (in early, non-typeset versions) from the journal&rsquo;s <a href="https://www.journals.uchicago.edu/toc/an/0/ja">Just Accepted</a> page. The special section is as follows:</p> <ul> <li>&ldquo;<a href="https://www.journals.uchicago.edu/doi/10.1086/720001">Nature, Data, and Power: How Hegemonies Shaped this Special Section</a>&rdquo; by Kamath et&nbsp;al.</li> <li>&ldquo;<a href="https://www.journals.uchicago.edu/doi/10.1086/720002">Moving beyond the &lsquo;diversity paradox&rsquo;: the limitations of competition-based frameworks in understanding species diversity</a>&rdquo; by Simha et&nbsp;al.</li> <li>&ldquo;<a href="https://www.journals.uchicago.edu/doi/10.1086/720003">Discussions of the &lsquo;not-so-fit&rsquo;: how ableism limits diverse thought and investigative potential in evolutionary biology</a>&rdquo; by Branch et&nbsp;al.</li> <li>&ldquo;<a href="https://www.journals.uchicago.edu/doi/10.1086/720131">What&rsquo;s Gender Got to Do With It? Dismantling the Human Hierarchies in Evolutionary Biology and Environmental Toxicology for Scientific and Social Progress</a>&rdquo; by Packer &amp; Lambert</li> <li>&ldquo;<a href="https://www.journals.uchicago.edu/doi/10.1086/720130">How Neanderthals became White: The introgression of race into contemporary human evolutionary genomics</a>&rdquo; by Weasel</li> <li>&ldquo;<a href="https://www.journals.uchicago.edu/doi/10.1086/720154">Colonial legacies influence biodiversity lessons: how past trade routes and power dynamics shape present-day scientific research and professional opportunities for Caribbean scientists</a>&rdquo; by Mohammed et&nbsp;al.</li> <li>&ldquo;<a href="https://www.journals.uchicago.edu/doi/10.1086/720153">Transforming Restoration Science: Multiple Knowledges and Community Research Cogeneration in the Klamath and Duwamish Rivers</a>&rdquo; by Klein et&nbsp;al.</li> <li>&ldquo;<a href="https://www.journals.uchicago.edu/doi/10.1086/720152">Fish, people, and systems of power: understanding and disrupting feedback between colonialism and fisheries science</a>&rdquo; by Silver et&nbsp;al.</li> </ul> <p><i><small>An earlier version of this announcement was posted on February 11, 2021, announcing the call for papers.</small></i></p> Mon, 04 Apr 2022 05:00:00 GMT Evolution 2022: Registration is Open https://amnat.org/announcements/Evolution-2022--Registration-Open.html Registration is now open for Evolution 2022! This is the perfect opportunity to test the exciting hypothesis that human beings are three-dimensional by going to an in-person conference again! There you will have the opportunity to observe humans in the wild and observe whether they flicker and emit blue light, or if they are in fact carbon-based life forms in three-dimensional space. Please consider the environment when making your travel plans. The stately Great Lakes city of Cleveland is accessible by rail, bus, and car from many points of the compass. A ride-share sign-up sheet is available via the Sustainability at Evolution 2022 webpage. A foodie paradise with great history, beautiful architecture, fun neighborhoods, excellent museums, and a national park right on its doorstep, Cleveland has tons to offer visitors whenever you aren’t attending events or networking with fellow members of Homo sapiens. <p><b><a href="https://www.evolutionmeetings.org/registration.html">Registration is now open</a> for Evolution 2022!</b></p> <p>This is the perfect opportunity to test the exciting hypothesis that human beings are three-dimensional by going to an in-person conference again! There you will have the opportunity to observe humans in the wild and observe whether they flicker and emit blue light, or if they are in fact carbon-based life forms in three-dimensional space.</p> <p>Please consider the environment when making your travel plans. The stately Great Lakes city of Cleveland is accessible by rail, bus, and car from many points of the compass. A ride-share sign-up sheet is available via the <a href="https://www.evolutionmeetings.org/sustainability.html">Sustainability at Evolution 2022</a> webpage. A foodie paradise with great history, beautiful architecture, fun neighborhoods, excellent museums, and a national park right on its doorstep, Cleveland has tons to offer visitors whenever you aren&rsquo;t attending events or networking with fellow members of <i>Homo sapiens</i>.</p> Mon, 04 Apr 2022 05:00:00 GMT ASN Presidential Award for Outstanding Service to the Community https://amnat.org/announcements/Outstanding-Service-Award.html The American Society of Naturalists is pleased to present to Dr. Todd Vision the ASN Presidential Award for Outstanding Service to the Community. This award, founded for the occasion, is to honor Dr. Vision for his exemplary service to the Evolutionary Biology and Ecology community in his leading role in the creation of the Dryad Digital Repository. Dr. Vision headed the team that created the digital architecture of Dryad and shepherded the project from the ideas stage to the creation of an international non-profit foundation that archives tens of thousands of data sets. Because of Dr. Vision’s work, it is now the norm that the foundational products of science—our data—are archived for later examination and use by other scientists. This honor comes with a plaque, an award of $2,000, and support for travel to the annual ASN meeting to receive the award. <p>The American Society of Naturalists is pleased to present to Dr. Todd Vision the ASN Presidential Award for Outstanding Service to the Community. This award, founded for the occasion, is to honor Dr. Vision for his exemplary service to the Evolutionary Biology and Ecology community in his leading role in the creation of the Dryad Digital Repository. Dr. Vision headed the team that created the digital architecture of Dryad and shepherded the project from the ideas stage to the creation of an international non-profit foundation that archives tens of thousands of data sets. Because of Dr. Vision’s work, it is now the norm that the foundational products of science—our data—are archived for later examination and use by other scientists. This honor comes with a plaque, an award of $2,000, and support for travel to the annual ASN meeting to receive the award.</p> Mon, 04 Apr 2022 05:00:00 GMT