ASN RSS https://amnat.org/ Latest press releases and announcements from the ASN en-us Wed, 30 Nov 2022 06:00:00 GMT 60 Applications for the 2023 ASN Early Career Investigator Award https://amnat.org/announcements/nominate-investigator.html The ASN Early Career Investigator Award honors outstanding promise and accomplishments of young investigators who conduct integrative work in the fields of Ecology, Evolutionary Biology, Behavioral Ecology, and Genetics. Applicants working in any of these fields are encouraged to apply. The award honors outstanding promise and accomplishments of young investigators (3 years post-Ph.D., or in the final year of their PhD) who conduct integrative work in ecology, evolution, behavioral ecology, and genetics (see * below). The award was established in 1984 to recognize exceptional work by investigators who received their doctorates in the three years preceding the application deadline, or who are in their final year of graduate school. The award was established in memory of Jasper Loftus-Hills (1946-1974), an Australian biologist of exceptional promise who died tragically during the course of fieldwork three years after receiving his degree. Winners of this award will present a research paper in the Young Investigator’s Symposium at the ASN annual meeting and receive a $700 prize, a travel allowance of $700, cost of registration for the meetings, and a supplement of $500 in case of intercontinental travel. Four awards are made annually. Recipients need not be members of the Society. In order to apply for this award, applicants should go to this Google form, where they will be asked to answer a few questions and upload their application (see ** below). The application should consist of one PDF, with the following (in this exact order): - CV (no page limit) - Research statement (3 page limit, including figures) - 3 of your published studies Additionally, two letters by individuals familiar with the applicant’s work should be uploaded by referees to this Google form (see ** below). Applicants are responsible for ensuring their letter writers submit their letters before the deadline (this can be done before submitting an application), as applications will not be considered complete without these two letters. * The standard timeframe covers anyone who graduated in 2020, 2021, or 2022 or who plans to defend in 2023. Time since PhD degree can be extended by 1 year for each child born or adopted during this period if the applicant was a primary care giver. Other forms of exceptional care giving responsibility (e.g. partner, spouse, aged parent, etc.) will be considered on a case-by-case basis. **Applicants and letter writers will be required to sign into an account registered with Google (does not have to be a Gmail address) to upload their applications and letters, respectively. If you or your letter writers do not have a google account, please send materials directly to Pierre-Olivier Montiglio. Jasper Loftus-Hills (1946-1974) was an Australian biologist of exceptional promise who lost his life doing fieldwork recording frog calls in Texas, three years after receiving his degree from the University of Melbourne. An obituary appeared in Copeia in 1974 (Alexander, Richard D. "Jasper Loftus-Hills." Copeia 1974:812-13). The Golden Coqu&iacute; (in the photo above) was discovered on Puerto Rico by George E. Drewry, Kirkland L. Jones, Julia R. Clark, and Jasper J. Loftus-Hills. They had planned to name the species for its color, but when Loftus-Hills was killed in 1974, his colleagues chose instead to name it in his honor. A further description of Jasper Loftus-Hills appeared in Copeia 2015 (103:467-475), which is a retrospective on his mentor, Murray John Littlejohn (doi:&nbsp;http://dx.doi.org/10.1643/OT-15-274) The most gifted graduate student Murray ever worked with (in his own estimation) was Jasper Loftus-Hills, whose Ph.D. thesis “Auditory function and acoustic communication in anuran amphibians” was completed in 1971. Jasper followed in Murray’s footsteps to Austin and then went on to Cornell University and the University of Michigan. He was tragically killed by a hit-and-run driver while doing night fieldwork on Gastrophryne in Texas in 1974. The 1992 Gastrophryne paper coauthored by Jasper and Murray is a lucid analysis of the state of the art in character displacement and reinforcement, two terms burdened with a long history of confusion. (Loftus-Hills, J. J., and M. J. Littlejohn.&nbsp;1992.&nbsp;Reinforcement and reproductive character displacement inGastrophryne carolinensis&nbsp;and&nbsp;G. olivacea&nbsp;(Anura: Microhylidae): a re-evaluation.&nbsp;Evolution 46:896–906.) &nbsp; <p>The ASN Early Career Investigator Award honors outstanding promise and accomplishments of young investigators who conduct integrative work in the fields of Ecology, Evolutionary Biology, Behavioral Ecology, and Genetics. Applicants working in any of these fields are encouraged to apply.</p> <p>The award honors outstanding promise and accomplishments of young investigators (3 years post-Ph.D., or in the final year of their PhD) who conduct integrative work in ecology, evolution, behavioral ecology, and genetics (<strong><a href="#time">see * below</a></strong>). The award was established in 1984 to recognize exceptional work by investigators who received their doctorates in the three years preceding the application deadline, or who are in their final year of graduate school. The award was established in memory of Jasper Loftus-Hills (1946-1974), an Australian biologist of exceptional promise who died tragically during the course of fieldwork three years after receiving his degree.</p> <p>Winners of this award will present a research paper in the Young Investigator&rsquo;s Symposium at the ASN annual meeting and receive a $700 prize, a travel allowance of $700, cost of registration for the meetings, and a supplement of $500 in case of intercontinental travel. Four awards are made annually. Recipients need not be members of the Society.</p> <p>In order to apply for this award, applicants should go to <strong><a href="https://docs.google.com/forms/d/1qa_PdZjuMAEWQM8x6M7QXqj6xV-4VgxTkBia-c2KVc4/viewform">this Google form</a></strong>, where they will be asked to answer a few questions and upload their application (<a href="#time"><strong>see ** below</strong></a>). The application should consist of one PDF, with the following (in this exact order):<br /> - CV (no page limit)<br /> - Research statement (3 page limit, including figures)<br /> - 3 of your published studies</p> <p>Additionally, two letters by individuals familiar with the applicant&rsquo;s work should be uploaded by referees <strong><a href="https://docs.google.com/forms/d/1wUqF130buexB5GkyO94KYUlSnhYZNomEsdbIwQ02Y7M/viewform">to this Google form</a></strong> (<a href="#time"><strong>see ** below</strong></a>). Applicants are responsible for ensuring their letter writers submit their letters before the deadline (this can be done before submitting an application), as applications will not be considered complete without these two letters.</p> <hr /> <p id="time">* The standard timeframe covers anyone who graduated in 2020, 2021, or 2022 or who plans to defend in 2023. <strong>Time since PhD degree</strong> can be extended by 1 year for each child born or adopted during this period if the applicant was a primary care giver. Other forms of exceptional care giving responsibility (e.g. partner, spouse, aged parent, etc.) will be considered on a case-by-case basis.</p> <p>**<strong>Applicants and letter writers will be required to sign into an account registered with Google</strong> (does not have to be a Gmail address) to upload their applications and letters, respectively. If you or your letter writers do not have a google account, please send materials directly to <a href="mailto:Montiglio.pierre-olivier@uqam.ca?subject=Early Career Investigator application">Pierre-Olivier Montiglio.</a></p> <hr /><p>Jasper Loftus-Hills (1946-1974) was an Australian biologist of exceptional promise who lost his life doing fieldwork recording frog calls in Texas, three years after receiving his degree from the University of Melbourne. <a href="/dam/jcr:50a091cd-227f-4bff-9f60-687a6679b1d8/JLH%20obituary.pdf">An obituary appeared in <i>Copeia</i></a> in 1974 (Alexander, Richard D. &quot;Jasper Loftus-Hills.&quot; <em>Copeia</em> 1974:812-13).</p> <p>The Golden Coqu&iacute; (in the photo above) was discovered on Puerto Rico by George E. Drewry, Kirkland L. Jones, Julia R. Clark, and Jasper J. Loftus-Hills. They had planned to name the species for its color, but when Loftus-Hills was killed in 1974, his colleagues chose instead to name it in his honor.</p> <p>A further description of Jasper Loftus-Hills appeared in <i>Copeia</i> 2015 (103:467-475), which is a retrospective on his mentor, Murray John Littlejohn (doi:&nbsp;<a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1643/OT-15-274">http://dx.doi.org/10.1643/OT-15-274</a>)</p> <blockquote>The most gifted graduate student Murray ever worked with (in his own estimation) was Jasper Loftus-Hills, whose Ph.D. thesis &ldquo;Auditory function and acoustic communication in anuran amphibians&rdquo; was completed in 1971. Jasper followed in Murray&rsquo;s footsteps to Austin and then went on to Cornell University and the University of Michigan. He was tragically killed by a hit-and-run driver while doing night fieldwork on Gastrophryne in Texas in 1974. The 1992 Gastrophryne paper coauthored by Jasper and Murray is a lucid analysis of the state of the art in character displacement and reinforcement, two terms burdened with a long history of confusion.<br /> (<span style="color: rgb(0, 0, 0); font-family: Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 12.51px;">Loftus-Hills, J. J., and M. J. Littlejohn.&nbsp;</span><span class="NLM_year" style="color: rgb(0, 0, 0); font-family: Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 12.51px;">1992</span><span style="color: rgb(0, 0, 0); font-family: Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 12.51px;">.&nbsp;</span><span class="NLM_article-title" style="color: rgb(0, 0, 0); font-family: Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 12.51px;">Reinforcement and reproductive character displacement in<i>Gastrophryne carolinensis</i>&nbsp;and&nbsp;<i>G. olivacea</i>&nbsp;(Anura: Microhylidae): a re-evaluation</span><span style="color: rgb(0, 0, 0); font-family: Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 12.51px;">.&nbsp;</span><span class="citation_source-journal" style="color: rgb(0, 0, 0); font-family: Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 12.51px; font-style: italic;">Evolution </span><span style="color: rgb(0, 0, 0); font-family: Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 12.51px;">46:</span><span class="NLM_fpage" style="color: rgb(0, 0, 0); font-family: Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 12.51px;">896</span><span style="color: rgb(0, 0, 0); font-family: Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 12.51px;">&ndash;</span><span class="NLM_lpage" style="color: rgb(0, 0, 0); font-family: Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 12.51px;">906</span><span class="citation_source-journal" style="color: rgb(0, 0, 0); font-family: Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 12.51px; font-style: italic;">.</span>)</blockquote> <p>&nbsp;</p> Wed, 30 Nov 2022 06:00:00 GMT Nominations for the ASN Award for Distinguished Achievement in the Conceptual Unification of the Biological Sciences https://amnat.org/announcements/nominate-conceptual-unification.html The American Society of Naturalists invites nominations for the 2023 ASN Award for Distinguished Achievement in the Conceptual Unification of the Biological Sciences. The Conceptual Unification award was established in 1991 for a senior but highly active investigator who is making fundamental contributions to the Society’s goals in promoting the conceptual unification of the natural biological sciences. The winner of the 2023 Conceptual Unification award will be announced by the President during the annual meeting prior to the Presidential address.&nbsp; The recipient will be invited to write a paper for publication in a special section of the journal and will receive an honorarium of $1000. The recipient need not be a member of the Society. The ASN strongly encourages its members to submit nominations of deserving people, preferentially scientists in their prime period as active and influential researcher rather than nearing retirement, who have been successful at conceptually unifying the biological sciences in some way. Ideally, all areas of ecology, evolution, behavioral ecology, and genetics are represented among the nominees. Nominations will be held over for two years. The names of former recipients can be found here. For the 2023 Conceptual Unification award, the prize committee encourages nominations from the membership. A nomination should consist of a letter with a brief description of why the nominee is deserving of the award. Please send all nominations by January 31, 2023, via e-mail to Ellen Ketterson (ketterso@indiana.edu). Please indicate “Conceptual Unification award” in the subject line and let the filename of the nomination letter indicate the name of the nominee. <p>The American Society of Naturalists invites nominations for the 2023 ASN Award for Distinguished Achievement in the Conceptual Unification of the Biological Sciences. The Conceptual Unification award was established in 1991 for a senior but highly active investigator who is making fundamental contributions to the Society&rsquo;s goals in promoting the conceptual unification of the natural biological sciences. The winner of the 2023 Conceptual Unification award will be announced by the President during the annual meeting prior to the Presidential address.&nbsp; The recipient will be invited to write a paper for publication in a special section of the journal and will receive an honorarium of $1000. The recipient need not be a member of the Society.</p> <p>The ASN strongly encourages its members to submit nominations of deserving people, preferentially scientists in their prime period as active and influential researcher rather than nearing retirement, who have been successful at conceptually unifying the biological sciences in some way. Ideally, all areas of ecology, evolution, behavioral ecology, and genetics are represented among the nominees. Nominations will be held over for two years.</p> <p>The names of former recipients can be <a href="https://www.amnat.org/awards.html#unification">found here</a>.</p> <p>For the 2023 Conceptual Unification award, the prize committee encourages nominations from the membership. A nomination should consist of a letter with a brief description of why the nominee is deserving of the award. Please send all nominations by January 31, 2023, via e-mail to Ellen Ketterson (<a href="mailto:ketterso@indiana.edu?subject=Conceptual Unification award">ketterso@indiana.edu</a>). Please indicate &ldquo;Conceptual Unification award&rdquo; in the subject line and let the filename of the nomination letter indicate the name of the nominee.</p> Tue, 08 Nov 2022 06:00:00 GMT